Famous Dave’s employee accused defrauding $1,136 by using employee discount

I work a side job at a bookstore, usually in 4-hour shifts, and I think I average about one check transaction per 4 hours. It's not common, but also not as unusual as you might think.

I never take my checkbook out of my house, but I do write checks for some of my household bills and for service calls. Small businesses often appreciate it because they don't pay fees on checks as they do on credit card transactions. I also use it in cases where I get charged a fee by a business for electronic transactions (utility companies seem to be big on this). Yeah, I'm not going to pay to pay you. I'd rather pay the post office for the stamp, it's cheaper.

I keep the duplicates in the box of checks in my desk, and so next time I'm trying to remember who I called last time for a dishwasher repair or whatever, I just flip through the checkbook until I see the duplicate check. (I'll have written a note of what it was for in the memo field.) Works for me.

This says the Federal Reserve processed about 4 billion checks in 2019.

https://www.federalreserve.gov/publications/2019-ar-payment-system-...ve%20Banks'%20operating%20expenses,2018%20(see%20table%201).

From what I have seen, the number of checks that are processed has declined each year since about 2000. But there are still people writing checks.

jimmyburke's avatar

It astounds me how much change occurs in just a matter of a few years. Not to bore y'all, but when I started working at the downtown Cleveland airport in the late 80's it was prior to checks being processed electronically. We had approx. 30 planes each night arriving and departing with loads of checks to be processed by the Federal Reserve Bank in Cleveland and also the outgoing batches. As the 2000's arrived those flights dwindled and by the time I retired in 2017 there was 2 check hauler flights.

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