Top Thrill Dragster 2022 Status

Jeff:

The use of that term makes science literate people itchy.

I get itchy when I stand in line and listen to the GP talk. Is that something I should I talk to my doctor about?

Jeff's avatar

Only if it results in an erection lasting more than four hours.


Jeff - Advocate of Great Great Tunnels™ - Co-Publisher - PointBuzz - CoasterBuzz - Blog - Music

Frog Hopper King's avatar

gross


argues just for clicks

Plague on Wheels's avatar

I'm beginning to think that they're disassembling it so carefully so each piece can be scrapped properly. For example each brake fin motor is being placed on a wodden palate, photographed, logged, and sold to the highest bidder on industrial machinery marketplaces. Lots of use for these types of motors in factories around the globe.

The only reimagining of TTD there will be, is reimagining of the shareholders bank accounts after they are done selling each piece off. I'll definitely bid on some of the more recognizable sections, like the light tree used at the start of the launch. Or the MPH electronic sign that was always juiced up anyways by 5-10 MPH. I'll install it in my backyard to see how fast my dirt bike goes :)

djDaemon's avatar

If they were removing valuable components for use elsewhere, as they did with WT, there's no reason they wouldn't have then simply torched track into pieces small enough to fit in a scrap bin, as they did with WT. Instead they invested their resources into trucking track off site where they took great care in sorting and stacking everything.


Brandon

The brake fins were not motor powered, were they? I am certain they were pneumatic cylinders.

I always thought they were hydraulic

djDaemon's avatar

They are pneumatic or hydraulic, according to RideMan:

...Intamin reversed the brake arrangement used on coasters such as Millennium Force, and returned to the configuration used on their drop towers. Permanent magnets are mounted on the bottom of the coaster train, and copper reaction fins are mounted on the track. The fins on the launch track are attached to actuating cylinders (either hydraulic or pneumatic; it isn't clear at this moment which) so that when the launch pusher reaches the end of the launch track, the brake fins are popped up into position. If the train fails to clear the tower, then, it will roll backward down the hill, and the brake fins on the launch track will bring the train to a stop.

However, I am not sure if this description is totally accurate. I recall that the brake fins are held in the braking position by springs, and during launch are actuated out of brake position by the cylinders, to create a failsafe condition so that in the event of loss of pneumatic/hydraulic power the brakes will revert to the braking position to stop the train in the event of a rollback. Of course I could be way off on this, but that's my recollection.


Brandon

You are correct. The fins would have to be in the "up" position in their fail safe state as this would ensure that they would be in the correct position to stop a train. Typically this would be accomplished by a spring return cylinder. To lower the fins air is applied to the cylinder to overcome the spring force that is pushing the fins up. To raise the fins the air is taken away and the spring pushes the fin up.

Plague on Wheels's avatar

No way dude, then how come there is always so much moisture dripping from beneath the brake fins? I always got dripped on when walking under the track at the ride entrance, just past the sample seat and height measuring stick.

I've noticed that too.... but the moisture always seemed to be coming off the launch cable. I just assumed it was part of a system to cool the cable/pulleys.

I had always figured that moisture was residual hydraulic fluid from the brake fins. Part of the reason I always assumed they were hydraulic

The dripping was from water used to cool the launch trough/ catch car. I believe that was added midway through the first season. In those days, it was accomplished by zip tying garden hoses to the track until a more permanent solution was implemented.

djDaemon's avatar

Are people honestly suggesting the park allowed hydraulic fluid to leak for the better part of two decades, and to allow said fluid to drip onto guests?

Wow... I mean, even if the park weren't concerned about the EPA and/or a lawsuit from a guest, they would certainly be incentivized to fix the leak so they wouldn't spend a fortune constantly replacing the fluid.


Brandon

Where was any of that ever dripping on to guests? Water or whatever it was always isolated underneath the fenced in area below the launch track

Plague on Wheels's avatar

Definitely was dripped on before. In the ride entrance area. Not sure what it was, but it was some kind of juice for sure. Most likely water to cool the cable like was mentioned above. There was always a puff/cloud of moisture at the end of each launch just as the train passed by. I assumed it was some kind of oil. LSM won't require juices to keep it running! Just the electronic kind of "juice".

Jeff's avatar

The catch car ran in a channel lined with what looked like a nylon substance, and it was slowed at the end I believe with its own magnetic braking. That caused a whole lot of heat, so water.


Jeff - Advocate of Great Great Tunnels™ - Co-Publisher - PointBuzz - CoasterBuzz - Blog - Music

All this talk about erections and juices and dripping…

PyroKinesis09's avatar

Yeah, that wasn't oil that dripped on you.

Plague on Wheels's avatar

CP should auction off the TTD juice, just like they auctioned off the WT track segments.

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